Livestock

08.06.2022

Swiss Dairy Farming in Transition

Swiss dairy farms are more strongly affected by structural change than other farm types. An analysis of the farms exiting the sector or switching focus highlights influencing factors.

30.05.2022

No evidence for bee fitness following sulfoxaflor application

No negative impact of pre-flowering application of the insecticide sulfoxaflor on Osmia bicornis was found. And fungicide azoxystrobin did not interact synergistically with sulfoxaflor.

05.04.2022

Hardy Grazing Livestock: Protectors of the Mountain Landscape

Biodiverse mountain pastures are being overgrown by green alder shrubs. A study conducted by Agroscope and ETHZ shows that hardy sheep and goats can stop shrub encroachment. In particular, the traditional Engadine sheep has a taste for green alder.

28.03.2022

The March 2022 Agroscope Magazine Is Online

Dip into our wide-range of topics, from Knowledge Co-creation to Work Programmes

19.01.2022

Controlling Problematic Plants on Summer Pastures

On alpine pastures, measures for controlling problematic plants are limited. Nevertheless, grazing offers many options, with goats e.g. able to reverse the advance of green alder.

18.01.2022

Researching in the System and with Practice

Agroscope’s new 2022–2025 Work Programme aims to strengthen system research and co-create more research with farmers. It is also increasingly guided by the principles of agroecology.

30.11.2021

November 2021 issue of agroscope magazine now online

This issue highlights various approaches aimed at creating a sustainable agriculture and food sector.

06.04.2021

March 2021 issue of agroscope Magazine now Online

From pitchfork to fork – this issue of agroscope Magazine focuses on selected food-production topics.

09.03.2021

Research for Resilient Pigs and Chickens

Agroscope and partners are launching the EU research project MonoGutHealth. This project aims to use innovative nutrition strategies to promote gut microbial colonisation in pigs and chickens in order to strengthen their resilience.

22.01.2021

Controlling Yellow Nutsedge with Free-Range Pigs

Using pigs to control yellow nutsedge is environmentally friendly, effective, protects the soil, and creates added value: the flesh of the animals can be sold as meat.